Wednesday, 28 April 2010

It's not just the way you tell 'em

When children grow up the building blocks aren't lined up into sensible rows all at once. Our four-year old has a formal understanding of what a joke is, but not a substantive one (well, either that or he's a surrealist):

Boy: "Why did the house climb up the tree?"

Father: "Er, I don't know. [Genuinely puzzled] Why did the house climb up the tree?"

Boy: "To eat the monkeys!" [Much hilarity].

7 comments:

Recusant said...

Now that is funny. Well it made me laugh, although I suppose you have to remember in your mind's eye that look that young boys can deliver, that mixture of innocence and cheekiness.

Whatever, he's worth a million Marcus Brigstocke's.

Gadjo Dilo said...

It is strangely funny. I remember a friend saying that his child (when a similar age to this one) repeatedly asked him "Dad, why is blue?", and how this was constantly amusing because even though he didn't think there was an answer to this his kid obviously knew better.

Sean said...

like father like son, keeping it real hey Garth? like gord your losing it, whatever "it" is. maybe you should ask junior :0)

jonathan law said...

Hah! Most kids seem to go through this non-joke joke phase - mine certainly did, prolifically and protractedly. I can only say that it's cute for a while.

But fascinating the way they learn the frame or format of a joke before they get the idea in any other way. This stuff ought to be grist to the mill of developmental psychologists and 'discourse analysts' of every stripe, I'd have thought.

Ian Wolcott said...

I think four year olds must share a single sense of humor. This sounds exactly like the jokes my daughter tells.

Brit said...

Heh heh, I love that kind of kid logic. I had one at a similar age that used the set-up and punchline format like this:

Is it cold outside?...
Is it cold inside?
....(punchline) Is it cold on my head?! (hilarity)

Still find it funny now.

Gaw said...

Glad you all enjoyed it. I shall look out for more. I'm still enjoying the idea of a monkey-eating house that can climb trees.